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I hope you’ve enjoyed the first annual Thought Leadership-SEO Week.  When I searched for content on the subject I was hard pressed to find things that intersected perfectly (and so the need to draw attention to it).  But I did find several gems.  So to wrap up this week, here are the top five posts that have heavily influenced my thinking and which I’m sure you’ll enjoy:

1. Craig Badings nicely assembles several definitions of what thought leadership is, and he invites everyone to contribute their own ideas in the comments.  I particularly like the one he plucked from RainToday: “You cannot go after a market without something authentic and valuable to offer, without something spun from the passion you hold for your area of expertise…”

2. You may know every SEO trick in the book, but as Elizabeth Sosnow points out, achieving thought leadership status requires people to jump higher hurdles than learning code.  How about “your need to make something perfect essentially dooms to the project” or “your audience doesn’t agree with it.” Ouch.  But so true.  Print it up and tack it to your wall.

3. What about managing the SEO and brands of the authors that write thought leadership works?  Chris Brogan has an outstanding post called “100 Personal Branding Tactics Using Social Media.” Not all of them bring SEO value, but if they’re applied to authors, they’ll help contribute to the total mix of what prospects find online.

4. Keyword selection often comes across as a black art.  There are thousands of tools and many of the metrics they tout can be vexing for those who don’t spend their days digging in Google’s sandbox.  But here are five free keyword analysis tools you can try right now, courtesy of Jeanne Dininni’s research.  The background she gives on each of these makes it  easy to wade into the keyword pool.

5. Lee Odden, whose SEO course I took and heartily recommend, recently wrote a lengthy post on the topic of content marketing and role of curation.  He notes, “Pure creation is demanding. Pure automation doesn’t engage. Content curation can provide the best of both.” He got a boatload of thought leaders to offer their thoughts, including Brian Solis, Ann Handley and Paul Gillin.  Go read it.  Yes, now.

Seen another post that should be added to the list?  Leave it in the comments knowing you’ll have everyone’s thanks!

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  • http://www.slamgobal.com S Lumsden

    Interesting and useful post – I like the idea of stirring social media to a science. You say you are interested in finding more posts on thought leadership – you might like our our most recent one: http://bit.ly/c7cUqv

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  • http://SellingTomorrows.com David Rosen

    Thanks S Lumsden. I checked out your post on the topic and really liked the line “the first generation of the internet gave niche topics a global audience and the second has built the specialist online communities to discuss them.” A good read for everyone.

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  • http://DCincome.com Jerick Thomas

    Glad to read this SEO post. L really appreciate the information and details that written on the post. Leadership is very important to run business well and to solve several problems that come on your company.

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